Pumpkin Watchers

The Pumpkin Watchers are a group of three pumpkin scare crows. They consist of large pumpkin heads, hands, and rib cages.

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Crumpled paper was used for three giant pumpkin headed scare crows. The technique for making these pumpkins can be found on STOLLOWEEN’s website.

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The ribs are made out of cardboard. I quickly free-handed the shape and cut it out with a utility knife. Didn’t even cut myself once! Down the sternum I added a ridge of cardboard. This is another technique “borrowed” from STOLLOWEEN. To give the bones a rounded look I used paper towels. This worked really well. What you do is lightly roll up a paper towel into a tube, dip said tube in paste, and gently scrape off the excess paste. Place the paper towel on the cardboard rib form. Once the entire rib form is covered in paper towel padding, use regular strip mache over top of it.

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The hands for the Pumpkin Watchers are very similar to the hands for Bonewart. The main difference, aside from scale, is that I used a chunk of recycled packaging styrofoam for the palms. This worked great. The fingers were positioned by twisting the paper tubes into the foam, the taped into place. Each hand has three fingers and a thumb. The fingers are made out of toilet paper tubes that were slit down the middle and rolled to about the thickness of my thumb. Each finger joint had a triangle snipped out of the end so it would slide over the previous finger. The wrist was just an unaltered toilet paper tube that was twisted into place. Each wrist/arm was made out of three tubes connected together. I left the arm open so the hands can slide over a PVC pipe or wood armature. The nails were cut out of cereal box cardboard. Balled up paper towel was inserted into each finger tip to round off the end of the fingers. The entire hand and wrist was then covered in a few layers of strip mache.

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Paper mache clay was added to the top of the pumpkins to give them some extra dimension.

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The hands were covered in paper shop towels to give them a nice wrinkled look.

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The pumpkin watcher heads were gutted and carved. For depth, cardboard was added in the eye, nose, and mouth holes. A little more paper mache clay around the edges of the facial features rounds out the heads.

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The body frames are PVC pipe with a little paint slapped on. They are really top heavy so tie down lines are needed at each elbow.

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4 Responses to “Pumpkin Watchers”

  1. WOW!!!! I am really impressed with these. How long exactly did it take you, from start to finish, to complete this project? When did you start and when did you finish? I am thinking about doing this for my yard and need to know, should I start now, July 23, 2013, or do I have time? Thank you for sharing.

  2. Thank you! I didn’t keep lots of notes on how long they took but here is what I would estimate if you were making 3 like I did:
    3-4 hours – create heads and cover in strip mache (let dry 1-2 days in front of a fan)
    2-3 hours – adding paper mache clay to the tops of the pumpkins an making stems(let dry 3-4 days in front on fan depending on how thick the clay is)
    1-2 hours – build hand armatures
    2 hours – cover hands in strip mache (let dry overnight)
    1 hour – cover hands with texture (let dry 1-2 days)
    1 hour – make rib cages
    2 hours – cover rib cages in strip mache (let dry 1-2 days)
    1 hour – paint everything black with a paint sprayer
    1-2 hours – hand paint job for all pieces (orange, green, yellow, to get your desired look)
    1 hour – build simple stands (1×2 crosses worked for me)

    I would think that you could do this over 3 weekends first build armatures and cover in strip mache for all pieces, next add paper mache clay where needed, then paint.

    I would suggest checking out http://www.stolloween.com/ for detailed info on the pumpkins, paper mache recopies, making paper mache clay. I learned everything I know from his workshops. If you are able to attend any of his workshops they are awesome!

    Best of luck!

    Apetoes.

  3. Hmm…I think I will make just one for this year.
    BTW, I visited the website you mentioned and WOW!!! Truly amazing stuff. I will definitely have to do one of his workshops. Thanks again and I’ll post my progress on my blog.
    Can’t wait to see what else you’ll come up with!

  4. Btw, my name is Tavo, and I hope you don’t mind that I follow you on your blog?


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